Monday, September 12, 2016

Do Not Layer Infield Mixes!

This week I was at a high school that was have issues with their infield.  I asked the AD if he new what type of material he was using.  He said he didn't but he paid a contractor to add infield mix to his field a year or two ago, so we dug a hole to take a look.  Here is what we found:


Needless to say the layering is causing an issue as well as using an infield mix that is high in silt and fine sand.  Click HERE to see an earlier post on layering infield mixes.

Click HERE to see how to add infield mix to an existing infield.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Overseeding Cool Season Athletic Fields

The overseeding window for cool season sports turf is open for many across the Midwest.  Lack of overseeding athletic fields and overseeding at the incorrect rates can be major reasons why athletic fields fail.  HERE is a great article from Pat Sherratt at Ohio State University.  HERE is a link from an earlier post on the SmartTurf Blog regarding overseeding.


Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Friday, August 19, 2016

Bulk Storage - Dirt Bunkers

A quick post in regards to bulk storage. (aka - dirt bunkers)   Bulk storage is critical to every site due to many cost savings achieved by purchasing in bulk.  Here is a photo of a basic bunker system:


Designs come in all shapes and sizes.  Some systems include a roof if infield mix is an intended product to store.  Bottom line is, a bunker system, should include at a minimum:


  • Hard surface floors - eliminate waste
  • Height and width to support a full truckload of material
  • Close to the fields for ease of moving material
Are dirt bunkers on your fall "to do list?"

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Use Caution with Glyphosate Applications

Many baseball and softball facilities take a back seat in late summer as fall sports take priority at the high school and recreational levels.  Many times, the ground staff will apply glyphosate to kill/control unwanted weeds and grasses on infields and warning tracks.  Bottom line, if the decision is made to apply these products be VERY CAREFUL with the application.  Here are what infield edges looked like at a high school I visited this week:



Needless to say, these edges have been severely damaged.  Sod will need to be installed to re-set the edges.  To avoid this, consider a couple options:

1.  Drag infields and warning tracks 2-3 times per week and edge fields at least once a month
2.  Apply Sureguard after play to limit weed population.  Click HERE to learn more about this process

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Building a Set of Base Anchors

Building a set of base anchors is a task that can be completed by a grounds manager or coach.  Here is a step by step method for building a set of base anchors.

1.  Organize the parts and the tools.  Items needed:

  • Base anchors
  • Duct tape
  • Screws
  • Drill
  • Tape measure
  • Circular saw
  • Scrap lumber 2x4 
  • Shovel
  • Quikrete
  • Wheelbarrow


2. Cut the scrap lumber into 8-12 inch pieces, and build a simple square form.   Keep in mind that this is not cabinet grade carpentry.  




3.  Tape the bottom of the anchors while mixing the Quikrete.  Using a scrap piece of plywood as a base, place an anchor in each form.  




4.  After the Quikrete cures (no more than 4 hours) remove the forms.  Now, you have a new set of base anchors.



Never use coffee cans. Round anchors have a better likelihood of spinning while in the ground.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Tricks of the Trade - Wheels on Soccer Goals - Covenant Christian

A quick post from Covenant Christian High School . Andy Gossel and his staff do a great job to provide some of the best baseball and soccer surfaces in the state of Indiana.  One of Andy's tricks is that all the soccer goals at CCHS are on wheels. After practice all the goals are moved off the field, and during practices the goals are moved to alleviate turf wear in the goalie box.



Notice the locations of the goals on the photos.  Yes, CCHS practices boys soccer on the baseball outfield with great success.  Bottom line, natural grass can take a tremendous amount of traffic if the field is under a great management program and traffic is rotated.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Monday, June 27, 2016

Updated: How to: Add New Mix and Level Baselines

Maintaining baselines that create a smooth and safe surface can be challenging. The photos below outline the process of adding new material to baselines. This leveling process will work on any baseball surface. Keep in mind, if leveling with a board, address all “lips” before grading.

Step 1 Edge the sod to create clean edges (address any “lips” as well). Then, add infield mix to the baselines and, using a 2x4 screed board, level the next material.


Step 2 Till the new material into the existing material. Ideally, the tilling depth is 3-4 inches. In this example, Dura Edge Pro was added/tilled to existing Dura Edge Pro baselines.


Step 3 Re-screed the tilled material.


Step 4 Using a 3 ton dual drum roller, roll the baselines.



Step 5 Add conditioner and drag.


This entire project for both baselines took approximately 3 hours.

Now the baselines are level and create smooth transitions between the turf and the infield mix.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer


Download the Smart Turf Sheet - How to: Add New Mix and Level Baselines

The original post can be viewed here