Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Weed Control for Infields and Warning Tracks


Across the country, high school and recreational baseball and softball seasons are starting to come to a close.  Volunteer staffs are heading out to summer vacation and the 4th of July.   Next thing you know your infield looks like the one below:


One way to control weeds (most likely crabgrass and goosegrass) on infields and warning tracks is to apply a tank mixture of glyphosate and Sureguard.  Click HERE to see an earlier post on this topic.

The application will typically give you 80-90% control which is much better than having to remove an infield full of weeds in the fall or early spring.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Yellow Nutsedge in Present - How Do I Control Nutsedge?

If you are looking at a fast growing sedge, there is a good chance it is yellow nutsedge.  Here is what yellow nutsedge looks like in the field:


How can you control yellow nutsedge?  Purdue Turfgrass and Penn State Turfgrass Extension have the details.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Infield Mix Drainage


With the recent heavy rains, infield mix drainage has been a hot topic.  Here are photos of 2 fields I have been to this week:



The issues with both fields?  An elevated grass edge "lip" along the back arc the is acting as a dam to hold the water on the infields.  How do you solve this problem?  




Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Preparing an Infield After a Rain Event


Rainy conditions across the country lead me to repost a blog entry from spring 2014.....

I get this question many times, "How do I prepare my infield after a rain event?"

The first step is to have a balanced infield mix profile that is laser graded.  Also, the correct depth of conditioner is important to take rain events effectively.

With that said, let me take you through the simple steps of getting an infield ready to play after a rain event.

The location is the new P&G Reds Urban Youth Academy in Cincinnati, OH.  The infield mix is a "hybrid mix."  The mix consists of 3 inches of Alvis Materials infield mix with 24 tons of FieldSaver50 and 24 tons of Dura Edge Classic from Natural Sand Company blended throughout the 4 inch profile.  Finally, the infield is conditioned with 120 bags (3 tons) of Turface Hertiage Red Calcined Clay.

First step - nail drag the infield to a depth of 1/4 inch using the VibraFlex on the ABI Force.

 Infield Prior to Nail Dragging

First Couple Passes 


ABI Force 


VibraFlex



Note: the depth is approx. 1/4 inch.  The goal is to break the surface tension and allow the conditioner to work.  DO NOT rip the infield up at depths exceeding 1/2 inch.  Using the simple "key test" is a great way for staff and volunteers to monitor depth of nail dragging.


Within 30 minutes the infield is starting to dry and the conditioner is ready for a finish drag.


The infield after a finish mat drag - ready for play within an hour of  beginning the process with little to no disruption to the infield surface.  Note - not one bag of calcined clay or a drying agent was used to get this field ready to play.

Bottom line - if the correct materials are installed and managed correctly, infields can take rain events and be ready for play without the need for a tremendous amount of drying agents, etc.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Tricks of the Trade - Use a Towel to Limit Clay Sticking to Tamp

The SmartTurf Blog has looked at wrapping a tamp with a plastic bag.  Another trick of the trade is placing a towel between the mound clay and the tamp to limit the clay sticking to the tamp.  Below is a photo of the trick in action in South Bend with the South Bend Cubs.


Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Monday, June 1, 2015

Be on the Lookout for Dry Turf Conditions


We are now entering early June, and thus warmer weather is upon us.  With the amount of rainfall in the Great Plains it is difficult to consider isolated dry spots and dry turf in general.  With the higher temps and low humidity, now is the time to start to be on the lookout for isolated dry spots in turf.  What do isolated dry spots in turf look like?  See below:



Notice the gray/black look of the turf.  These areas clearly need water.  After a heavy water event, think standing water, here is what the same area from the last photo above appears:


As you can see, this areas appears a bit darker, but is has begun the hydration process critical for healthy turf growth.  

Bottom line, continue to monitor turf conditions daily.  During times of heavy play and dry weather conditions, more damage can be done due to dry soil conditions than wet soil conditions.  One event on dry turf can cause damage that can take a couple weeks to repair.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Tricks of the Trade - Use a 4 Inch Pop-Up on Irrigation Heads

When choosing irrigation heads, consider using a head that has a 4 inch pop-up.  The photo below shows a head with a 2 inch pop-up.  As you can see the head is not reaching above the turf canopy, thus the head is providing poor distribution.


Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer