Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Saint Mary's of the Woods - Universe Mowing Vol II

Back to Saint Mary's of the Woods and the Universe Mowing project from late last week.

The first question is why?  The answer arrives in a couple forms.  First, the coach and athletic staff wanted to remove the bumpy surface to create a smooth ball roll with healthy, thatch free, aggressively growing turf.   Secondly, they wanted to remove as much tall fescue and annual bluegrass as possible while not completely regrading the field with the goal of having the field ready for play by senior day in late October of this year.  Finally, they wanted to  have the most advanced Barenbrug bluegrass that can tolerate low cutting heights.

So, the process was:


  1. Universe mow the existing turf stand
  2. Seed into the stand 
  3. Topdress with 25 tons of rootzone sand
  4. Apply starter fertilizer (16.28.12) at a rate of 4 bags per acre
Here is the step by step approach:

Universe Mow:



Overseed:




Topdressing:



Look for additional posts as the SmartTurf team will follow the progress of the playing surface.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Saint Mary's of the Woods Soccer - Universe Mowing - Vol 1

Last week, the J&D Turf team was in Terre Haute, IN with Jerad Minnick of Growing Innovations.  The task, Universe Mow the soccer field at SMWC to smooth the surface and clean up the stand of tall fescue.

Here is a photo of the Universe Mowing:


Why Universe Mow?  What is the process?  Check the SmartTurf Blog tomorrow for a detailed report of the process.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Tricks of the Trade - Synthetic Turf Under an Infield Tarp

Another post from the popular "Tricks of the Trade Segment."

In this application we look at the use of a old synthetic turf scrap to place under a rolled tarp next to a chain link fence.  This solves the maintenance of the grass near/under the tarp.


Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer


Tuesday, September 2, 2014

FieldSaver 90 Installation in Sarasota, Florida


Last week, the SmartTurf team was in Florida.  The task, to assist in the installation of FieldSaver 90 at a Sarasota County Softball Complex.  Why?  Simply stated, the infield mix in Florida typically is orange in color and has an overall sand content of 80-85% with a silt content of around 1% and a clay content of 15-19%.  Bottom line, there is not enough silt in the mix to hold together.  Hence the infield break apart and the high sand content blow to the edges creating "lips."

Adding FieldSaver 90, or a similar product will drive the sand content down to a typical recreational range while assisting to raise the SCR (Silt to Clay Ratio)

Here were the steps:

Topdressing the FieldSaver 90 Amendment 




Tilling in the FieldSaver 90 Amendment


Rolling the Infield


After Initial Laser Grading


Final Cross Section of the Infield Mix Profile - You Can Amend an Infield


In conclusion, an infield can be amended, but you need to know 2 things:

1.  What does you existing material consist of - pull a sample and send to an independent soils lab
2.  Blend an amendment into the profile at a 3-4 inch depth that will "balance" an infield - in this case a 90% silt/clay product.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Thursday, August 28, 2014

A Core Sample Can Tell A Story - Part II

Back to the core samples posted on Tuesday.  Why is there a difference.  First a little background.

The Field:

  • Sand based bermudagrass
  • Topdressed and aerified regularly
  • A higher end playing surface
Back to the photos:



In the first photo, from the turf down, you can see a small sod layer from the sod installed this year along with a small organic layer built up every 1/4 inch.  Why?  That is the amount of sand that is topdressed on an annual basis - much like a ring on a tree.  What is the heavier clay/black layer further down?  That is the sod layer from the original sodding process 6 year ago.

On the second photo you see a more visual difference.  Why?  Thick cut sand based sod grown on plastic was installed in high traffic areas.  So, the sand that was imported is 1 1/2 inch thick.  If you look closely, you can see the sod layer deep into the hole.

Bottom line, take frequent core samples of your field.  This field drains extremely well - in excess of 10 inches per hour, but it still has it's layering challenges.  

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

A Core Sample Can Tell a Story - Part 1

Pulling regular core samples off a playing surface can help with maintenance and assist in telling a story in regards to a natural grass playing surface.  Below are two samples from the same field.  Why are there differences?



The answer and an explanation will be posted tomorrow.

Go to j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer

Sunday, August 17, 2014

New Bermudagrass - Fountain Central High School

As many of you know, this past winter was very harsh on bermudagrass.   Fountain Central High School needed to re-seed their football field with Riviera bermudagrass.  Here is what the field looked like on June 28, 2014:


Here is what the field looked like on August 14, 2014:






The field was reseeded on June 1.  Even with the coolest July on record, there was no problem re-establishing this playing surface.

How was this accomplished?  A little fertilizer, topdressing, irrigation, frequent mowing, and attention to detail.

Go to  j-dturf.com to learn more about J&D Turf.

Play on!
--Jamie
@JamieMehringer